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adidas
/ May 2020
By Michael McEwan

3 Stripes, 1 Planet: How adidas Golf is leading the fight to end plastic waste

Golf courses are a haven for greenery, fresh air and wildlife. adidas Golf are joining the mission to save one of the planets favourite sporting canvasses.

Every day, approximately eight million pieces of plastic pollution find their way into our oceans, with as many as 5.25 TRILLION macro and microplastic pieces floating in the open sea.

To put it another way, that’s the equivalent of every single human on Earth throwing 700 pieces of plastic into the water.

As you might expect, all this has taken a significant toll on marine wildlife. More than 100,000 mammals and turtles, and over one million sea birds, are killed by plastic pollution every single year.

Without immediate action, the problem could get a whole lot worse, with some experts predicting than our seas will be filled with 640 million tons of plastic by 2034 – just 7 Ryder Cup matches from now. That’s up from 1.5 million tons in 1950.

/ May 2020
By Michael McEwan